Uralla celebrates our Great Outback Barbie in style

Uralla celebrates our Great Outback Barbie in style

Uralla celebrates our Great Outback Barbie in style

IMG 8000 smlIf you want to experience the hospitality of the Bush, drop into the little western NSW town of Uralla. Uralla is a heritage district famous as the birthplace of local Bushranger ‘Captain Thunderbolt’- whose story features prominently in the museum there. But it’s the friendly folk you’ll meet who’ll stay in your memory long after your visit.

Each year, The Uniting Church Adult Fellowship organises a fundraising barbeque lunch for Frontier Services. This year’s festivities were bigger than ever with about 400 people attending the function on Saturday 12 September.

Besides snags hot off the barbie, bountiful salads of every description, and wicked desserts – all provided by the UCAF- local musicians and singers entertained the diners throughout the afternoon.

The Welcome to Country was given by Thunghutti elder, Kitty Kelly, who also sang and played guitar in the melodious ‘Sing for Fun and Joy’ group. They were followed by the strum-diddly-strum-strum of massed ukulele group “Misspent Ukes” who got everyone singing along with a selection of evergreen hits. The final musical item was a harmonious medley of Australian songs performed by the UCAF Choir.

Frontier Services Major Gifts Officer, Dan McAloon, who drove from Sydney to speak at the occasion, did not arrive empty-handed. Dan brought complimentary copies of the Frontier Services centenary book ‘At The Very Heart’ by Storrey Walton to hand out. The book chronicles 100 years of Inland mission 1912-2012.

“This book describes one of the greatest stories of service, faith and sacrifice in the history of Australia,” said Dan. “We’d like you to take this into your home and into your hearts, and find within its pages the inspiration to keep supporting us in our quest to reach the people at the very physical margins of our great country.”

Pictured: Mr Graham Mackay, head of the Armidale Church Council, holding Frontier Services centenary book